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STANDARDS

CCSS: 6.EE.A.2.C, MP3, MP4, MP6

TEKS: 6.7A

Create It With Code

You can learn basic computer science in just one hour!

Given just one hour, Roshni Srikanth can show an entire class how to use computer code to make a dragon fly through a maze or make a robot dance. Roshni, a 17-year-old senior at Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, Washington, helps run Hour of Code events along with her twin sister Tarini. While the students are bringing their games and apps to life, Roshni and Tarini are also teaching them the basics of computer coding. “Students can see their dragons move and the things they’re doing,” Roshni says. “They’re able to problem solve by themselves.”

In just an hour, Roshni Srikanth can teach an entire class to make a flying dragon using computer code. Roshni is a 17-year-old senior at Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, Washington. She helps run an event called Hour of Code with her twin sister, Tarini. The sisters teach students the basics of computer coding by helping them make basic games and apps. “Students can see their dragons move and the things they’re doing,” says Roshni. “They’re able to problem-solve by themselves.”

The Hour of Code is an international event held during Computer Science Education Week, from December 9 through 15 this year. Its goal is to get classrooms around the world to spend one hour on a computer science project. Students of all levels can participate with activities that teach the basics of computer coding.

“The Hour of Code is an opportunity to try computer science. In one hour you can build a game or app or code art. You can get a sense of what computer science is,” says Alice Steinglass. She’s the president of Code.org, which helps run the Hour of Code. The event started six years ago.

The Hour of Code is an international event. It’s held during Computer Science Education Week, which is December 9 through 15 this year. To participate, classrooms around the world spend one hour on a computer science project. Even students who have never coded before can join in. The activities teach the basics of computer coding.

“The Hour of Code is an opportunity to try computer science. In one hour you can build a game or app. You can get a sense of what computer science is,” says Alice Steinglass. She’s the president of Code.org, which helps run the Hour of Code. The event started six years ago. 

Computers are vital in classrooms and beyond. But as Steinglass points out, many students aren’t learning how they work or how to program them in school. “We learn how to read books, but imagine if we only learned how to read and never how to write. Learning computer science in school is enabling everyone to not just be a reader but also a writer,” Steinglass says.

The Hour of Code helps students get excited about computer science by letting them try it firsthand. “Our main goal is not for anyone to be scared,” says Tarini. “We’re saying if you want to be a computer scientist, don’t let anyone stop you.”

Many people use computers every day. But many students aren’t learning how they work or how to program them, says Steinglass. “We learn how to read books, but imagine if we only learned how to read and never how to write,” she says. Computer science teaches students how to “write” things like games and apps.

The Hour of Code helps students get excited about computer science by letting them try it themselves. “Our main goal is not for anyone to be scared,” says Tarini. “We’re saying if you want to be a computer scientist, don’t let anyone stop you.”

Ronald Large/2018 ©Melissa Wrenchey

Roshni Srikanth teaches an Hour of Code lesson to elementary school students.

On a separate sheet of paper, use the MATH++ programming language to write code to evaluate the following expressions. Record your work and answers on our answer sheet.

On a separate sheet of paper, use the MATH++ programming language to write code to evaluate the following expressions. Record your work and answers on our answer sheet.

Write a MATH++ program for: 10 × (2 + 5)

Write a MATH++ program for: 10 × (2 + 5)

Write a MATH++ program for: (10 × 6 + 2 + 2) ÷ 8

Write a MATH++ program for: (10 × 6 + 2 + 2) ÷ 8

Write a MATH++ program for: 30 – 33 ÷ 3 × 2

Write a MATH++ program for: 30 – 33 ÷ 3 × 2

Write a MATH++ program for: (10 × 2)2 + 5

Write a MATH++ program for: (10 × 2)2 + 5

For the expression (2 + 7 × 4) ÷ 3 × 5, a student writes this program in MATH++:

For the expression (2 + 7 × 4) ÷ 3 × 5, a student writes this program in MATH++:

MULx (7, 4)

MULx (7, 4)

SUM+ (RES#, 2)

SUM+ (RES#, 2)

DIV/ (RES#, 15)

DIV/ (RES#, 15)

SOLVE=

SOLVE=

Is their program correct? If not, find their error and debug, or fix, the program.

Is their program correct? If not, find their error and debug, or fix, the program.

Google Quiz

Click the Google Quiz button below to share an interactive version of the questions with your class. Click Download PDF for the non-interactive blank answer sheet.

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